My Blog Week: July 28 to August 3

A black cat, nicknamed Nortie, who serves as Torsade's site ambassador.

All the Latest from Torsade!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoon of Boston molasses flood

Cartoon of the Week: Gettin’ Sticky

 

 

 

 

A Word on the Week

 

Stylized photo of ammonite

Shut Down the Message

 

 

 

Why should we suppose, when the American president began to escalate his blatant racism, and many regular citizens recognized in this White House rhetoric, a new line crossed—or what could be termed a new phase entered—that his most fanatical followers did not see the same thing? My plan for WOW had already been to make this point…that it’s time to treat the president as we treat other racists. I’ve heard pundits make the argument that his divisive remarks deserve an answer, and can’t be allowed to pass. This sounds proactive. But consider that newscasters don’t track down the daily spewings from the worst of white nationalist websites, read these posts out faithfully, continually play segments of their videos…

In fact, you probably can’t, and I can’t, name these sites (excepting the one just featured in the news). I don’t know them, and I wouldn’t look them up, either. Does any responsible person truly believe giving amplification to white nationalists, serves the cause of “answering” their hateful message? No, we already know, and we already practice, the better way. When Trump talks to reporters on the WH lawn, holds rallies, while news agencies should be present to cover the event, broadcast and print reports might merely say, for example: “The president today, asked by reporters about North Korea’s new missile tests, offered no committed statement.” 

Nothing about this summary keeps the public from knowing what of public note was said. It keeps the scornful tone, and the contempt, and the shouting, from receiving free promotion. Why not, again, as to rallies: “The president campaigned in Ohio today. During his remarks he reiterated familiar themes, while making no committed statements as to policy positions for 2020.” 

And for late night talk-show hosts, the time has come to let the jokes speak for themselves, and leave the clips and Tweet-reads behind.

 

Where’s the Money Come From?

 

In this week’s Democratic debate, we heard the refrain again. How can we pay for universal healthcare? We might mention, as one possible framing device, the troubled F-35 jet program, notable here because it seems allowed to carry on without that question being raised. Universal healthcare must be paid for by existing allocations, by savings from reduction of redundancy, by standardization of pricing, and by raising of additional revenue. In the program’s building stage, it would be hard to get more specific than that. You don’t, when you plan a vacation, know to the cent how you’re going to pay for your lunch on the third day, either…your plans are based on general assumptions, as they have to be.

 

Lord Only Knows

 

Brief mention, of Congressman Tim Ryan’s concern about Bernie Sanders yelling, expressed during the aforementioned debate. Last week, I commented on abnormalizing. This is the type in thing in action. Bernie is Bernie, of course, as we might say pro wrestling is pro wrestling. There are certain features inherent to the performance. If this were a serious case of abnormalizing, the next step would be to goggle at the possibility of being unsafe around Bernie. Just what might he be capable of, etc., etc.

 

Must We Game?

 

Reports in the Twittersphere have it, that some voters are concerned a woman, or non-white candidate, won’t be able to beat Trump. They would rather vote for Kamala Harris or Elizabeth Warren, or Cory Booker, but they lean towards Biden. Best of luck, of course, to whoever the primary winner is, but if you were a guerrilla in this game, you’d register Republican and vote for Bill Weld. Such tactics are not recommended. But, as long as you’re not really playing, why not quit calculating and support the candidate you like?

 

 

 

 

The Week began with Celebrated, on Monday, an episode with an excerpt from Petra’s aborted book project; Tuesday’s Sequence of Events, brought the story to a close, with a final statement, and a dispersal of the players. Wednesday and Friday, two parts of the short story “Authority Weighs In” from Tourmaline, in which Sergeant Herward allows the Ftheorde to take charge. Thursday, in Catastrophe, the rest of the bishop’s letter, ending with a suggestion the faithful dig deep and pay alms for their safety. Saturday, a new Hammersmith, the beginnings of resolution for the rebels and the visitors, and for Aimee and Vic. (Hammersmith has grown above 40,000 words, so it now qualifies as a short novel, rather than a novella.)
Images on my posts often have a link to related information (click first image), sometimes serious, sometimes whimsical, sometimes in answer to a direct reference. Since people can be leery about links, I include them here: what they are, what sites they point to.

 

 


 

 

My Blog Week: July 28 to August 3

 

Celebrated (part eighteen)
July 29

 

Sequence of Events: Anarchy (conclusion
July 30

 

Authority Weighs In: Sixth Tourmaline (part two)
July 31

 

La Catastrophe de la Martinique: sixty-seven
August 1

 

Authority Weighs In: Sixth Tourmaline (part three)
August 2

 

Reckoning Up: Hammersmith (thirty-nine)
August 3

 

 

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